Even though the Nissan Leaf only has a driving range of 107 miles, Nissan is making it easier for East Coast drivers to get around. Nissan and EVgo have revealed a plan to connect Boston and Washington D.C. via nine electric-vehicle DC fast-charge sites.

2017 Mazda CX-9 Review Nissan and EVgo have revealed a plan to connect Boston and Washington D.C. via nine electric-vehicle DC fast-charge sites. Nissan, EVgo, Nissan Leaf, charging, electric car, ev, green car, charging stations, Boston, Washington d.c.

The plan will create a better charging infrastructure along I-95, this fall.

The “I-95 Fast Charge ARC” is already under construction. Covering the 500-mile span between the two cities, the nine sites and 50 total charging stations will be able to charge up to four vehicles at a time. The charging technology continues to advance and luckily the charging sites have been also designed with that in mind. The sites are already pre-wired to accept a high-power charging power output of up to 150kW so that it won’t take long to upgrade the systems once the technology is available.

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“Regardless of range capability, a convenient fast-charge infrastructure along high-traffic routes is imperative in the mass-adoption of electric vehicles,” said JeSean Hopkins, senior manager, EV infrastructure strategy & business development, Nissan North America, Inc. “This element of the EV equation is seemingly overlooked by others, but we’re all-in. Following a similar project in California, this is our second ‘corridor’ project in the U.S. and completion is expected in time for the launch of the all-new Nissan LEAF.”

Source: Nissan