The small luxury SUV segment is packed with players, which includes the Audi Q3, BMW X1, and Volvo XC40. Cadillac also offers the XT4, which is a stylish small crossover with a big interior, that’s also packed with features.

The 2020 Cadillac XT4 is now in its second model year without any significant changes. When we first drove the XT4 we liked its handsome exterior, although it’s not as stylish as the Volvo XC40. Some styling standouts are its vertical headlights and taillights that let you know that the XT4 is anything but a Cadillac.

2020 Cadillac XT4 Review

The XT4 may play in the small compact arena, but it’s actually bigger than most of its rivals, with its length and width dwarfing its most of them. It’s almost seven inches longer than the XC40. This larger footprint gives the XT4 a spacious interior and at the same time gives it more road presence.

Inside the interior has a minimalistic feel without a plethora of buttons, like some other competitors. But overall the XT4’s interior design is not very stylish. At the center of the dashboard, there’s an 8.0-inch touchscreen, which can also be operated via a rotary dial behind the gear shifter. The materials are ok, but not great when you move up to the higher trim levels. We also noticed some occasional rattles, which we wouldn’t expect in a Cadillac.

2020 Cadillac XT4 Review

Some of the interior highlights are the comfy leather seats and the infotainment system is pretty easy to use. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are standard. Plus there are USB-A and USB-C ports, 4G LTE WiFi and satellite radio. Wireless charging and a head-up display are optional.

Since the XT4 is bigger than the Volvo XC40 and BMW X1, which helps give it more rear legroom, 39.5-inches to be exact. The only downside is that the XT4’s rear seatback is too upright, so although there’s lots of space in the back, it’s not as comfortable. If only the rear seats reclined, then the backseat would be a much more comfortable space to be in.

While there’s more legroom than its rivals, the XT4’s cargo space is more on par with its rivals, at 22.5 cubic feet of space with the rear seat up and 48.9 cubic feet with the seat folded.

The 2020 XT4 is powered by a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine that generates 237 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque that’s mated to a 9-speed automatic transmission. Front-wheel drive is standard, but all-wheel drive is optional.

The XT4 is rated at 24 mpg city, 30 mpg highway and 26 mpg combined with front-wheel drive and 22/29/24 mpg with all-wheel drive.

2020 Cadillac XT4 Review

How does it drive? The XT4’s turbocharged charged four-cylinder has a good amount of low-end torque to make it easy to drive around the city. The four-cylinder has an acceptable amount of power on tap, but the XT4 is not as quick as its rivals. The engine is also a bit loud too when pushed hard.

While the XT4’s engine moves the XT4 down the road with ease, there are a few other areas that aren’t as great. The steering feels a bit too numb and the transmission can be a bit slow to downshift. The suspension does do a good job of swallowing the road’s imperfections. If you opt for the Sport model, the XT4 gets continuously-variable damping.

On the safety front, the 2020 XT4 comes standard with automatic emergency braking, front pedestrian braking, forward collision alert, and rear park assist. Other options, include a blind spot monitor, lane keep assist, reverse automatic braking, a rear camera mirror, adaptive cruise control and front park assist.

The 2020 Cadillac XT4 is offered in three trim levels: Luxury, Premium Luxury and Sport. The XT4 starts at $36,690, while the Premium Luxury and Sport trim levels both start at $40,790. If you opt for all-wheel drive, those prices up to $39,190 for the Luxury trim level and $43,290 for the other two trim levels.

REVIEW OVERVIEW
Design
Performance
Infotainment System and Tech Features
Fuel Economy
Value
Marc Carter is the Editor-in-Chief and founder of The Torque Report. When he's not writing news or reviews for The Torque Report, he also contributes to Inhabitat.com.